Dentistry2019-01-16T12:41:25+00:00

Because They Matter

Dental care for the one you love.

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Getting to the root of dental issues.

Caring for your pet’s teeth and gums is critical to his health. According to the American Animal Hospital Association, more than 85% of dogs over four years of age have periodontal disease. This makes periodontal disease one of the most common diseases seen by veterinarians. Because of the need for oral care in your pets, our doctors have taken the time to learn advanced oral treatment techniques from board certified dentists. Our Licensed Veterinary Medical Technicians (LVMTs) have also completed many hours of continuing education in the areas of oral care, dental cleanings, digital radiology, and ways to prevent periodontal disease.

At Animal Care Veterinary Hospital, we include a thorough oral assessment with every comprehensive dental cleaning. This includes full mouth X-rays with every procedure to allow us to carefully assess your pet’s oral health both above and below the gums and to provide valuable guidance when oral surgery is necessary.

How Do I Know if My Dog Has Periodontal Disease?

Periodontal dental disease occurs when pet’s gums become inflamed, infected, and painful due to buildup of plaque and tartar at the gum line. Overtime this causes bone loss and eventually tooth loss. Our Licensed Veterinary Medical Technicians (LVMTs) are trained to evaluate your pet’s mouth between doctor visits to help you stay on top of your pet’s oral health. Schedule an appointment with one of them to see if further care is needed. Some warning signs of periodontal disease to look for at home are:

  • Bad breath
  • Loose or missing teeth
  • Signs of pain while chewing
  • Swelling of the face or mouth
  • Swollen and bleeding gums

If you suspect your pet may have periodontal disease, our doctors and nurses can help you assess them and formulate a game plan.

How Do I Know if My Dog Has Periodontal Disease?

Periodontal dental disease occurs when pet’s gums become inflamed, infected, and painful due to buildup of plaque and tartar at the gum line. Overtime this causes bone loss and eventually tooth loss. Our Licensed Veterinary Medical Technicians (LVMTs) are trained to evaluate your pet’s mouth between doctor visits to help you stay on top of your pet’s oral health. Schedule an appointment with one of them to see if further care is needed. Some warning signs of periodontal disease to look for at home are:

  • Bad breath
  • Loose or missing teeth
  • Signs of pain while chewing
  • Swelling of the face or mouth
  • Swollen and bleeding gums

If you suspect your pet may have periodontal disease, our doctors and nurses can help you assess them and formulate a game plan.

What Will Happen During My Pet’s Dental Procedure?

If your pet needs dental care we are here to help make the process as easy as possible for you and your furry companion!

Once your pet has been admitted into the hospital you can rest assured you have an awesome team ready to make his or her visit as comfortable as possible!

One of our LVMTs will go over the hospital admit paperwork, answer any questions you might have, and set up a time for you to pick up your pet to be discharged that afternoon.

If bloodwork has not been performed in the last 30 days we will perform an in-house panel to check blood counts, kidney and liver function and to make sure they can safely metabolize the anesthesia medications. They will also have an ECG performed to check heart rate and rhythm.

Your pet’s veterinarian will assess your pet just before the procedure to make sure they are ready and that their current health status is known.

You may notice a small shaved spot on your pet’s leg after the procedure. This is where we place an IV catheter that allows us to have easy IV access to administer anesthetics, any needed medications, and IV fluids. These fluids help us keep your pet’s blood pressure regulated and their tissues well perfused and hydrated so that they wake up healthy and happy.

For the safety and comfort of your dog or cat, we provide anesthesia for all dental procedures. Our LVMTs will monitor your pet before, during and after the surgical procedure to ensure a safe recovery. If your pet has evidence of advanced oral disease, we treat possible post-procedure pain before they wake up.

A thorough scaling and polishing of all parts of each tooth will remove plaque and tartar that have accumulated. Once the tooth surface is clean each tooth will be gently probed to determine if there is any underlying periodontal disease. Any abnormalities are recorded in your pet’s medical records.

Digital oral radiographs give us an amazing super power to see below the gum line to further diagnose any oral health issues your pet might be experiencing! This is an important step that helps your pet’s doctor look at the 60% of the tooth that is hidden below the gum line. We include these with every dental cleaning and assessment and are frequently amazed at what is hidden just below the surface!

Once your pet’s mouth has been evaluated and cleaned, the doctor will examine his or her mouth and review the gum assessment charting and the oral radiographs to determine a plan for any abnormalities. It is vital to your pet’s care that you are available by phone during the procedure so the doctor can discuss their recommendations and you can decide as a team how to proceed.

Once your pet’s Comprehensive Dental Cleaning with Oral Assessment and Treatment has been completed, he or she will recover on a comfy cot with one of our LVMTs by their side. Your pet’s comfort level will be evaluated continuously during the recovery process to ensure his or her pain or discomfort is being well-managed.

During your pet’s discharge an LVMT will discuss your pet’s unique after-care instructions. This will include what to expect in the first 24 hours after anesthesia, how to administer any medications your pet has been prescribed, and any limitations they may have over the next two weeks.

Two weeks after your pet has been discharged from the hospital we will need to see him or her back for an included recheck exam with an LVMT. At this visit your pet’s mouth will be inspected and further at home care instructions will be discussed. We will help you establish a home routine that works for you and your pet.It’s easy to take care of pet’s dental health as well as you take care of your own. Annual dental exams and as-needed dental cleanings are a good start. We can also help you come up with effective ways to improve dental health at home.

Call (615) 896-3434 or click here to schedule a dental appointment today.